Shocked wife killer punished for ‘silence’

To Borce Ristevski, his refusal to tell why or how he killed his wife Karen just cost him another four years behind bars.

Ristevki, 55, was resentenced today in the Victorian Court of Appeal for the manslaughter of his wife on 27 years in their Avondale Heights home in 2016.

His original sentence of nine years with a minimum of six was set aside and a new sentence of 13 years with a minimum of 10 years was inserted in its place after prosecutors appealed.

In court today, the three judges savaged Ristevski for his lies and his silence.

Outside court, Karen’s brother Stephen went a step further, telling reporters capital punishment — the death penalty — should be reinstated in Victoria.

Karen Ristevski with her husband and killer Borce.

Karen Ristevski with her husband and killer Borce.Source:Supplied

Ristevski is comforted at his wife’s funeral. Picture: Joe Castro/AAP

Ristevski is comforted at his wife’s funeral. Picture: Joe Castro/AAPSource:AAP

‘NOT ONE SCINTILLA OF REMORSE’

Borce Ristevski sat with his hands crossed in front of him. He wore a white shirt and dark tie as he had during every court appearance. He looked shocked when the Chief Justice Anne Ferguson changed his fate.

Sitting in the back row of the court, his daughter Sarah gripped a woolen scarf and showed little emotion after learning her father was not coming home until at least 2027.

Chief Justice Ferguson said Ristevski showed a “total lack of remorse” for the killing of his wife and the series of events that followed, including putting her in the boot of his car, driving her to bushland, dumping her body and lying about his involvement.

“His conduct after he killed his wife significantly aggravated his offending,” she said.

“Ms Ristevski should have been safe in her own home.

“Mr Ristevski did not simply maintain his silence but took immediate positive steps to avoid his crime being discovered.”

She said he had “not shown one scintilla of remorse” for what he did.

Ristevski confessed to the killing on the eve of a Supreme Court trial this year but has refused to say why or how he killed his wife.

Ristevski’s lawyer David Hallowes last month told the court his client was a good man.

“He was a man of good character,” he told the court.

“He was 55, had no prior convictions. Your honours have read the character reference of (his daughter) Sarah Ristevski. He contributed to society. He worked hard.”

Ristevski carries his wife’s coffin. At the time, he told friends and family he knew nothing about what happened to her. Picture: Joe Castro/AAP

Ristevski carries his wife’s coffin. At the time, he told friends and family he knew nothing about what happened to her. Picture: Joe Castro/AAPSource:AAP

Ristevski was jailed for a minimum six years before prosecutors appealed. Picture: James Ross/AAP

Ristevski was jailed for a minimum six years before prosecutors appealed. Picture: James Ross/AAPSource:AAP

But prosecutors successfully argued his silence should cost him.

Prosecutor Brendan Kissane told the court last month Ristevski’s silence was an indication of the seriousness of the killing.

“What silence means … when one puts all of that together … what one can say about what occurred in the house is that it must’ve been something significant,” he told the court.

“What one concludes is that something bad must have happened in the house.”

Mr Kissane said Ristevski’s lies – which began immediately after he killed his wife – should also be given greater weight.

“That continues to this day,” Mr Kissane said.